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Solar Eclipse 2017

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Date: August 21, 2017
Time: 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Location Ballard Park
Member Price: FREE
Non-Member Price: FREE
Summary:
A beltway across the USA will experience a Total Solar Eclipse. But Connecticut's view will be just a partial eclipse. We will be assisting the Ridgefield Library's Viewing Party - Join in the fun
Detailed Description:

On August 21, from Oregon to South Caroline, the Sun's path will be blocked by the Moon in a Total Solar Eclipse.  Only the corona will be visible in the pathway of totality.  However, Connecticut will not witness totality.  Instead we will see an eclipse of .75 magnitude, as shown in the picture above.  It will start at about 1:24pm, reaching maximum blockage at 2:45PM and end at 4pm.  The total event time will be about 2 hours and 36 minutes.  Those standing in the narrow path of totality will experience an errie twilight during total blockage, lasting about 2 minutes 40 seconds. The Connecticut experience will not be nearly so exciting. 

Looking directly at the sun, even when it is partially covered by the moon, can cause serious eye damage or blindness. NEVER look at a partial solar eclipse without proper eye protection.

Cliff Wattley of The Discovery Center.will be conducting an educational presentation at 12:30PM at the Library.  For more information on the event click here

Solar eclipses only occur when a New Moon passes through a lunar node.  A lunar node are the two points where the Moon's path in the sky crosses the ecliptic, the Sun's path in the sky.  Because the Moon's orbit is 5 degrees off the ecliptic, not every New Moon creates a solar eclipse.  This happens usually two times a year.  But in a rare year, it can happen as many as 5 times. The next solar eclipse to effect the US will be in April 8, 2024.  That one's path of totality will begin in Mexico and Texas and travel up the Ohio Valley and into Canada and northern New England. 

Lunar vs. Solar:  Even though solar eclipses take place every year, they are considered a rare sight for two reasons.  A solar eclipse is only visible along a very limited pathwaty.  A lunar eclipse is visible from every location on the night side of the Earth.  Lunar eclipse tend to last longer than solar and thus occur much more frequently in any given location.

Please note:  The Discovery Center will be co-

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Watch for these Programs:
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  • More 'Ghosts' in October
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